living woman

The colors red, white, and black reference blood/violence, life/death, and purity. These are resonant themes particularly for a female Christian body. Menarche is considered a central event for cis-gendered womanhood/sexuality, and is reminder of life and its loss; for Christians, the drinking of elements symmbolizing Jesus’ blood is a rite to salvation, and a reminder of life after death.  I use white as a transparency to show a multitude of colors behind whiteness; this suggests that purity--sexual or religious--is more complex than it seems.


Fight Flight Remember

video in wooden box, fabric, string, 2013-16, 18 ½ x 26 ¾ x 4 ½, full length: 21m

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In the video, my interactions with fabric depict a process of recovering from sexual assault. My body is at first consumed by sheets, under which I discover a dress, which I throw about, crush, gingerly place, and finally, wear and wash. The video is encased in a wooden box, covered in fabric at the top and bottom, and divided into three parts by a fabric mat, like a triptych altar. String is wrapped around the electrical cord, which loops and hangs like an umbilical cord, breaking up the hard lines of the box.


Sanguine: Way

hand stamped clothes of mine, hand stamped glass, 2014, 6” x 10’ 5”

Stations 9-11

Stations 9-11

In Sanguine: Way I re-contextualize the Stations of the Cross to be about the menstrual cycle. This dignifies the perception of the menstrual cycle into a sacred experience, and associates Jesus’ journey to the cross, often depicted in an epic, hyper-masculine way, into a vulnerable experience which is routine for many women with uteri.

The colors red, white, and black reference blood, life/death, and purity. These are resonant themes for those with menstrual cycles, and are also essential to a central message of Christianity, Jesus’ death and resurrection.  I use white to create gradations, or as a transparency to show a multitude of colors behind whiteness; this suggests that purity is more complex than it seems.

There are fourteen pieces, corresponding to the fourteen stages of the Stations of the Cross:

i. HER BLEEDING BEGINS

ii. SHE CARRIES HER CROSS

iii. SHE FALLS THE FIRST TIME

iv. SHE RESTS

v. SHE REBUILDS

vi. SHE WIPES HER FACE

vii. SHE OVULATES

viii. SHE COLLECTS

ix. SHE SECRETES/SHE MEETS THE WOMEN

x. SHE IS LEFT EMPTY

xi. SHE LIES DOWN

xii.SHE DEGENERATES

xiii. SHE ENDS ENDOMETRIAL

xiv. HER RESURRECTION

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WEAR & TEAR: living woman

performance art: video reel, 2015-16, 2m 37s (full length: 25m)

In this video reel of a performance at the Community Media Center of Marin, I tell the story of my sister’s experience with pregnancy, giving birth, and early motherhood. I intermingle various approaches to knowing in this performance, playing recordings of my mother reading from a biology book, my sister recounting the obnoxious process of shopping for clothes that fit her new body, and my baby nephew screaming.

The backdrop is created in collaboration with Melissa Marie Harvey, with clothing that my sister and other friends could not wear during their pregnancies. Occasional projections depict close ups or interior views of the performance sculptures I interact with, such as the hanging red fabric which drips milk during a section about nursing and soothing the baby.


HOME GROAN: blast-o!

performance art object: paper mache made with wrapping paper + tissue paper from sister’s baby shower, 2014, 18” x 17” x 17”

Meant to resemble a blastocyst (a stage of embryonic development) as well as nursing breasts, this hat/mask is used during the performance of WEAR & TEAR: living woman.

In my conversations with her about motherhood, my sister remarked how strange and uncomfortable it was to be regarded by her newborn as a source of food, her breasts, a method of feeding. This hat/mask comically depicts the breasts as the overwhelmingly prominent physical identifier.

This sculpture enlarges and displays breasts and the blastocyst--parts of the body that represent key stages of pregnancy and motherhood--making what is hidden visible.

The orbs range from full and almost bursting, to deflated and shrunken, to nubs that are still growing. White covers over orange, blue, yellow, red, green, colors that are all visible from inside the sculpture when it is worn.

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